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The Cost of Getting Your Driving Licence.


The freedom that comes with being a qualified driver is fantastic and exciting, but it does come with a price tag.
It’s important to know exactly where your money will go during the process of learning to drive, so we’ve listed the key costs.

Your provisional licence

This is the first step.
Having this licence allows you to learn to drive on the public highway, and is a requirement for taking your practical test.
Cost: £34 if you pay online, or £43 if you apply by post.

Driving lessons

You can only start lessons if you have the provisional licence.
Lesson prices vary from instructor and location, however the average cost for a driving lesson in the UK is around £24, according to the Driving and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA).
Generally speaking, it can often work out cheaper to purchase lessons in bulk as you will most likely receive a discount – however, have a few lessons with your instructor beforehand to be sure they’re the right instructor for you.

Cost:

As already said, lessons vary in price depending on instructor and location.

Theory test

Start to learn your theory as soon as, it will help you with your lessons...
I have a free app on my website for any one to download and use.
The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) provides online learning materials for you to buy, or you can buy additional software or a theory book from most major book stores, or online.
It’s essential to clue-up on the Highway Code and to practice the hazard perception tests.

Cost: £23 for the theory test. Learning materials starts from £7. (Don´t forget my FREE app)

Practical driving test

Individuals will each progress at their own rate, and your driving instructor will advise when they think you are ready to take your practical test.
Cost: £62 on weekdays, £75 on evenings, weekends and bank holidays.



Cost of getting your Licence PART 2


Insurance

You do not have to worry about insurance if you are learning to drive solely with a qualified instructor, as his or her car will be insured.
However, if you are also having extra lessons with a friend or family member, you need to ensure you are covered by an insurance provider to drive their car.
If you are having extra lessons in a friend or family member´s car, they can add you as a named driver – however, this can result in a sharp hike in premiums, and a loss of any no claims discount should you have an accident.
To avoid this, many insurance providers readily offer insurance specifically for learner drivers.
This can be expensive, as learner drivers are seen as more likely to make a claim. However, if you stick with the same insurance provider once you have passed your test, you could be in line for a discount on a standard policy.

Cost: Prices vary, and insurance providers will generally offer packages to cover you for a couple of months....so shop around!

Pass Plus

If all goes well, you’ve now passed both your theory and practical driving tests, and you are now a qualified driver!
Some new drivers choose to take part in the Pass Plus scheme. This is a voluntary, practical experience that is in place to give new drivers some extra skills and confidence on the road. For example, you may be driving on the motorway and at night.
Pass Plus is a great way in receiving a discount on your car insurance, as many insurance companies will give you a substantial percentage off if you have completed the course.
That said, it’s still important to shop around, as a discounted premium could still be more expensive than the price quoted by another provider.

Cost: This varies according to your location or driving school, and some local councils offer discounts to those wishing to take Pass Plus.


Once again thanks very much for all you have done, i mean it when i say you made passing my test effortless TOP BLOKE!!

Nick West of Gloucester


My name is Nick West and I live in Gloucester. I chose Mike Williams Driving School because they were the only driving school that got back to me after I sent out a few texts.I got your contact number from the first page of google when i googled "Driving lessons Gloucester"I was nervous about taking driving lessons because of my age and lack of experience. Mike was friendly and calm. Never once did i feel like i was being spoken down to or judged to an impossible standard. I was expecting an irritating man who was used to spotty teenagers giving him attitude what i got was the complete opposite. a very nice bloke. Mike obviously has a lot of experience with people and that shows in all of his communications and manner. His teaching methods felt tailored to my needs. I was always impressed with his notes about previous lessons and the way he always asked me what I wanted to focus on. Mike also prepared me for what to expect on my test. His instructions are clear and precise, I was never in any doubt as to what was expected from me. He may not realise it but he gave me loads of tips and tricks on how to become a better driver and how to be a better student. Thanks mate. Yes I would recommend Mike Williams because of everything mentioned above ^^^. he made it really easy for me to learn how to drive and pass my test. I´ll actually miss our little chats. I´d also like to mention that his prices are very reasonable and the 2 hour lessons are perfect.

Once again thanks very much for all you have done, i mean it when i say you made passing my test effortless TOP BLOKE!!

Nick


Defrosting your vehicle incorrectly could leave you with a £60 fine<br />
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We’ve all seen those annoying drivers on a cold winter’s morning – scraping just enough ice from their screen to give them a ‘porthole’ for vision, but what you may not know is that anyone caught driving like that could face a £60 fine and three penalty points.<br />
<br />
In fact, as winter rolls around again,

Defrosting your car incorrectly PART 1


Defrosting your vehicle incorrectly could leave you with a £60 fine


We’ve all seen those annoying drivers on a cold winter’s morning – scraping just enough ice from their screen to give them a ‘porthole’ for vision, but what you may not know is that anyone caught driving like that could face a £60 fine and three penalty points.

In fact, as winter rolls around again, it’s worth knowing that there are a few situations that could see you in hot water if you’re not aware of them – the act of ‘portholing’ is just one of them.

Partial vision


With police forces actively clamping down on drivers with poor vision, it was only a matter of time before the net widened to try and catch drivers that are too lazy to clear their windscreen properly before setting off.

Whilst a £60 fine and three penalty points may seem harsh for failing to clear the screen, the reality is that there’s no real difference between that and driving with poor eyesight, which carries a much stiffer penalty, it could possibly be argued that failing to clear a screen should carry a harsher penalty still.

While ‘portholing’ is a very defined term, what isn’t clear is just what that constitutes – how much of the screen should be clear? Common sense tells us that any significant obstruction to our view is dangerous, and that to take an extra few minutes to finish clearing the screen and windows is the sensible choice, but does the screen need clearing completely, or just the majority?
The Highway Code is very clear:

You must be able to see, so clear all snow and ice from all your windows
You must ensure that lights are clean and number plates are clearly visible and legible
Make sure that the mirrors are clear and the windows are demisted thoroughly
Remove all snow that might fall into the path of other road users


Engine idling<br />
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<br />
While it’s tempting to start your car and let the heat do the work for you, that in itself can be an offence if the vehicle is on a public road (as opposed to your driveway), which could result in a £20 fine.<br />
<br />
Section 42 of the Road Traffic Act of 1988 and rule 123 of the Highway Code states that “you must not leave a vehicle engine running unnecessarily while that v

Defrosting your car incorrectly PART 2


Engine idling


While it’s tempting to start your car and let the heat do the work for you, that in itself can be an offence if the vehicle is on a public road (as opposed to your driveway), which could result in a £20 fine.

Section 42 of the Road Traffic Act of 1988 and rule 123 of the Highway Code states that “you must not leave a vehicle engine running unnecessarily while that vehicle is stationary on a public road”. However, defining necessary or unnecessary could potentially be a defence; it was necessary to demist or de-ice the windscreen. It would take a particularly zealous police officer to book you for the offence.

Perhaps of more importance is the fact that any insurance company would likely refuse a claim if your car was stolen under the same circumstance; leaving your car to de-ice with the engine running unattended would likely be seen as a failure in duty of care – that you’ll take reasonable precaution to keep your vehicle safe.

Driving in winter

Driving in winter presents a host of new challenges that we in the UK aren’t specifically taught how to deal with, and no amount of ‘how-to’ articles will prepare you for the reality of driving in snow and ice. Best advice (when the weather is particularly inclement) is to only drive when completely necessary.

Should you find yourself in the position of having to make a journey, experts say that you should have a Winter Survival Kit prepared. This may seem extreme, especially if you’re confident of your abilities, but many times, drivers have found themselves stuck due to other motorists.


Your winter kit should include:<br />
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Any personal medications<br />
Fully charged mobile phone with in-car charger<br />
First aid kit<br />
Road atlas (in case of detours and road closures)<br />
Blanket<br />
Shovel<br />
Ice scraper and de-icer<br />
Torch with spare batteries<br />
Snacks (in extremis!)<br />
Extra screenwash<br />
Shop bought de-icing solution is readily available through supermarkets, garages and convenience stores, but shoul

Defrosting your car incorrectly PART 3


Your winter kit should include:

Any personal medications
Fully charged mobile phone with in-car charger
First aid kit
Road atlas (in case of detours and road closures)
Blanket
Shovel
Ice scraper and de-icer
Torch with spare batteries
Snacks (in extremis!)
Extra screenwash
Shop bought de-icing solution is readily available through supermarkets, garages and convenience stores, but should you wish to make yourself a greener remedy, or in case you run out of pre-packaged, you can make a simple de-icing solution using three parts white vinegar to one part water.


My name is Annamaria Kiss and I chose Mike Williams for my driving lessons because he had the best feedback on the internet with his great customer reviews I got his phone number from his website and gave him a call to arrange lessons I found the experience of learning to drive much easier than I thought it would be I found Mike to be very professional and he had a very good eye for the small

Passed. Annamaria Kiss of Gloucester


My name is Annamaria Kiss and I chose Mike Williams for my driving lessons because he had the best feedback on the internet with his great customer reviews. I got his phone number from his website and gave him a call to arrange lessons. I found the experience of learning to drive much easier than I thought it would be. I found Mike to be very professional, and he had a very good eye for the small details that needed to be improved on. I would definitely recommend Mike as a driving instructor to other people as I always felt safe and calm during every one of our driving lessons. Thanks again for all your help and guidance Mike! Annamaria Kiss, Gloucester


A friend of my Mum recommended Mike as a driving instructor so I chose to have my driving lessons with him I found Mike to be a very good instructor and learning to drive easier than I had expected due to his teaching and coaching I will certainly be recommending him to friends and family Thanks for everything Mike<br />
<br />
Alex Bowkett Gloucester

Alex Bowkett of Gloucester


A friend of my Mum recommended Mike as a driving instructor so I chose to have my driving lessons with him. I found Mike to be a very good instructor and learning to drive easier than I had expected, due to his teaching and coaching. I will certainly be recommending him to friends and family. Thanks for everything Mike.

Alex Bowkett, Gloucester


Mike´s teaching methods are very calm and he explains things simply(in a good way) so you can understand what he is trying to say, it is so nice that he is so chilled as that made me feel relaxed and steady.

Cara McGrath from Gloucester


My name is Cara McGrath and I live in Gloucester.

I chose Mike Williams as my driving instructor because his website was really useful and I could tell that Mike enjoyed his job and was passionate about it! I found his contact number on his website, and I was really happy with the quick response I got.

As I have had a previous Instructor I was worried that the learning to drive experience would be the same, but it was a lot better than I expected and very happy that I swapped instructors, he made me feel so confident!

Pay As You Go from
Gloucester and Cheltenham for lessons.
See relevant area page for more info
£42.00
View info
10 hrs - Gloucester
Lessons are for 2 hours, or 90 minutes
£270.00
View info
Intensive Courses from
See Intensive Courses page for more details

Retest courses available
Full courses from 12 - 42 Hours
£416.00
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Collingwood Learner Driver Insurance

My Mission is to get You to Pass your Test 1st Time!
Mike Williams Driving School
Mike 07863 239 331
Lesson times
Mon
0900-1830
Tue
0900-1830
Wed
0900-1830
Thur
0900-1830
Fri
0900-1830
Sat
0900-1600
Sun
N/A
Bank hols
Closed
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